Amazing Trees—The Unique and the Odd

Celebrating the beauty and uniqueness of trees. Please enjoy! (All photos by Nathan or Sandi Lawrence)

A 4,500Y Year-Old tree Tree Stump. This ancient Sitka spruce relic is located at Beverly Beach State Park on Oregon coast.

Spirit Lake at Mount Saint Helens. Almost 40 years after the 1980 Mount Saint Helens volcanic eruption, Spirit Lake is still covered with floating old growth conifer logs.

“Healed” Tree Stump. In a forest of Douglas fir trees, when a tree is cut down and stump is left, you’ll sometimes find the tree stump healed over. Why is this? This is because all the tree roots are connected—a literal family of trees—and when one is wounded the remaining living trees heal the wound of the cut tree to prevent diseases from entering into the tree family.

New growth is already beginning to form on this “dead” fir stump. Eventually, the top of the stump will be healed over.

A Wysteria “Tree.” This wysteria vine in complete bloom covers this entire 60 foot tall spruce tree near Forest Grove, Oregon.

Ghost Forest, in Neskowin, Oregon. These spruce trees are thousands of years old and landed on the beach when an earthquake occurred and the tree-covered cliffs above slid into the Continue reading

December in the Garden—A To Do List

YOU can help to make the world a better, a more friendly, loving and beautiful place by tending your spot on this earth that has been given to you—your garden. Here is a to do list to help you to do just that…

Tree and Shrub Care

Storm proof your larger trees. Checking your trees for hazards and then take the appropriate measures to protect your trees from storm damage. If you’re not sure about the condition of
your trees or even what to look for, call Good News Tree Service, Inc. for a free on-site consultation.

Plant or transplant trees and shrubs. After the cold, seasonal rains have started is a good time to plant or transplant ornamental trees and shrubs. Cooler weather means less transplant shock to the plants, and over  the winter and spring, they will have time to begin to acclimate to their new environment before the stress of the next summer season occurs.

Prune your trees and shrubs. This is a good time to start pruning your deciduous trees and Continue reading

November in the Garden—A To Do List

YOU can help to make the world a better, a more friendly, loving and beautiful place by tending your spot on this earth that has been given to you—your garden. Here is a to do list to help you to do just that…

Tree and Shrub Care

Storm proof your larger trees. Checking your trees for hazards and then take the appropriate measures to protect your trees from storm damage. If you’re not sure about the condition of
your trees or even what to look for, call Good News Tree Service, Inc. for a free on-site consultation.

Plant or transplant trees and shrubs. After the cold, seasonal rains have started is a good time to plant or transplant ornamental trees and shrubs. Cooler weather means less transplant shock to the plants, and over  the winter and spring, they will have time to begin to acclimate to their new environment before the stress of the next summer season occurs.

Prune your trees and shrubs. This is a good time to start pruning your deciduous trees and Continue reading

Are your trees hazardous? Are you sure? Here’s how to find out…

Are your trees safe, or are they dangerous, hazardous and at risk of breaking or falling down during the storms, wind, snow and ice that will inevitably pummel the Wilsonville region this winter? 

Trees are a major part of our lives. We love trees! They’re nearly everywhere including where we live, walk, play, drive, work, eat, recreate and go to school. Sometimes we even plan activities around them. We take them for granted because they are big, old and seem so permanent, stable and immovable. Most of the times, trees cause us no problems. However, trees can, at times, become dangerous. If they fall over or break apart, they can cause serious injury or death to humans and animals, and major damage to property.

How do you know if your trees are at risk of blowing over or breaking when the storms come? What are some signs that your trees might be dangerous and hazardous and might become victims to the ravages of winter storms including ice, snow, wind and rain?

Here are some signs that your tree might be a hazard tree: Continue reading

How to “Storm Proof” Your Trees and Shrubs

Are your trees ready for our fall and winter storms? Winds, ice, snow and even rain can cause damaging (and expensive) tree failures. The twisting and torquing force of wind on trees combined with soils super-saturated from rain can cause trees to break or uproot. Ice and snow are heavy, which can put stress on trees, causing them to break apart.

What can you do to prevent the uncontrollable forces of nature from indiscriminately, and without your permission, “pruning” your trees often resulting in damage to property and injury to people not to mention loss of property value due to broken, decimated and just plain ugly trees? If you are in Wilsonville, Oregon or the nearby cities including Tualatin, Canby, Aurora, Hubbard, Sherwood and the surrounding areas, we can help!

Be proactive and have an expert ISA Certified Arborist examine your trees before the winter storms hit the Wilsonville region causing damage to your trees.

Even better, the check up on the health and stability of your trees is absolutely free—without any cost or obligation to you. All you have to do is to call Nathan Lawrence at the Good News Tree Service, Inc. in Wilsonville at (503) 682-9466 to schedule a free consultation and Continue reading

The Hymn of a Ponderosa Pine

 

 The inspiration of this poem and its birth occurred, while meditating next to the  Deschutes River in La Pine, Oregon, during Sukkot (the biblical Feast of Tabernacles) in 2018, while gazing admiringly at the mighty, towering ponderosa pine trees (Pinus ponderosa) that stand as sentinels gracing its banks. At the same time, the words of the biblical First Psalm were floating around in the author’s mind.

By Nathan Lawrence

La Pinus1 ponderosa2 at De Falls3 River waters4;

A weighty5 giant pondering6 heavenly matters.

Rejecting your former blackjack7 past,

Basking now in heaven’s light at last.

Arms and trunks are tanned a bright orange hue8,

With muscular limbs upraised in praise to You9

To the Messiah, the radiant Sun of Righteousness10!

Part 2 Continue reading

Nathan in Search of Giant Trees

Because of his passion for trees, Nathan, the Treevangelist, is magnetically drawn to large trees. Wherever he goes, he seeks out giant trees and gets up close and personal with them. Please enjoy these photos of some amazing trees!

Nathan and the largest Banyan tree in North America in Lahaina on Maui, Hawaii.

Nathan and the largest diameter ponderosa pine in the world located in La Pine, Oregon at 9 feet two inches in diameter at breast height.

Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. But his delight is in the Torah-law of Yehovah; and in his law doth he meditate day and night. And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth his fruit in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper. (Psalm 1:1–3)

Nathan with a giant Sitka spruce on Baronof Island in Alaska.

Continue reading

How Trees Benefit You

  • Trees improve water quality by taking up ground water, filtering it through their vascular system and then releasing it in a purified state into the atmosphere. This along with a trees releasing of pure oxygen is why the air feels so clean and refreshing in a forest.
  • Tree roots help to hold soil in place, especially on slopes, along roadways and on riverbanks, thus helping to prevent soil erosion and valuable topsoil from washing away. Topsoil, which takes hundreds and even thousands of years to produce is necessary for growing food crops.
  • Trees planted in urban areas soak up surface water that would otherwise run into storm sewers thus reducing the amount of polluted water going into our watersheds. 
  • Trees help to reduce energy consumption by humans. Trees lower ground temperatures by blocking sunlight from hitting the ground. The shade that trees produce benefits both humans and animals. For example, a house shaded from the hot sun can be 10 degrees cooler than a non-shaded area, thus saving money and valuable energy needed to cool a house in hot weather. In a general sense, shade from trees makes living conditions on earth more tolerable in hot climates for both humans and animals. They act as air conditioners in that on sunny days they release huge amounts of water which helps to cool the atmosphere. This natural process is called evaporative cooling.
  • Trees block harmful ultraviolet rays from hitting people who take shelter under them.
  • Trees also cool the air around them, since their leaves release water, making the earth more temperate.
  • Trees soak up large amounts surface water runoff (in their roots and leaves) from rain thus reducing soil erosion especially on hillsides, riverbanks and along roads (and loss of valuable food producing topsoil) and water-born pollutants that would otherwise flow into lakes, stream, rivers and eventually oceans.
  • From trees humans make many products essential to human life including wood and paper products, pharmaceuticals and food.
  • Trees provide habitat for countless animals and mircro-organisms that are essential to human survival. 
  • When trees take in carbon dioxide (CO2), they strip the carbon atom from the oxygen atoms, thus releasing the oxygen back into the atmosphere, but they keep the carbon with which they combine minerals from the soil to produce tree food. The food that trees don’t use immediately is stored in the roots, trunks and branches of the tree for later use. This is called carbon sequestration, and is a good thing in that this helps to reduce atmospheric “green house gases.”
  • Trees reduce air pollution by scrubbing the air of pollutants as they trap airborne particulate in their leaves, trunks and branches.
  • Trees promote physical, emotional and psychological health and healing of people as well as feelings of peace and well-being.
  • Trees in retail business areas help to increase business.
  • Trees mark the changing of the season, thus helping humans to mark time.
  • Trees create countless economic opportunities for humans (logging and wood products, arboricultual services, firewood, food and agricultural production and more).
  • Trees provide places for children to play and people to gather around for social functions.
  • Trees have served as memorials, historical markers, landmarks and property boundaries since time immemorial because they live for so long. A tree memorial can become a living legacy to a loved one or an important historical figure. As such, trees help to give humans a sense of history, identity, permanency, and a connection to their past history. Trees also help to bring the generations together by giving people a sense of unity and a connection to the past.
  • Trees provide visual barriers from unsightly objects and views. They provide hedges, create screens, fences and separations between people when privacy is needed.
  • Trees create wind screen, thus protecting people, structures and crops from damaging weather (e.g. heat, wind and frost).
  • Trees are a valuable fuel source providing heat for homes and are an energy source to generate power.
  • The presence of trees increase property values.
  • Trees, in general, make the earth, our homes and cities a more visually pleasing, hospitable and inhabitable place to live.

Why Humans Can’t Live Without Trees

  • Trees (and other plants) produce oxygen. Human and animal life need the oxygen for their survival, which trees (and plants) produce. Plants take in CO2 (carbon dioxide), the gas humans and animals exhale, and turn it into O2 or oxygen.
  • All animals and humans receive food directly or indirectly from trees (and other plants). Food for humans that trees produce include nuts, fruits and syrups.
  • Trees produce clouds in non-coastal areas due to their uptake of water from the soil and then release it into the atmosphere to form rain clouds, which then are carried by air currents into otherwise arid areas not near coastal regions.

Thus Sayeth Nathan, the Treevangelist…

Welcome to my blog where trees (both on a physical and spiritual level) are the main subject. Stay tuned for articles, mostly of a practical (and from time to time, spiritual) nature, about the caring for and nurturing of trees and plants, and how you can better care for them, thus, hopefully, inspiring you to help make the garden of the earth around you a more beautiful place. — Nathan Lawrence, the Treevangelist